Three Fix50 workers were injured in an usual construction accident. The construction workers were struck by a flying board, which had been knocked out of another worker’s hands by a big rig truck. The worker, who had been carrying the board, didn’t notice when the back of it swung over the concrete safety barrier, which separates the work area from the vehicles driving by on Highway 50.

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The injured construction workers included a Caltrans consultant and two workers from Myers and Sons, who is the contractor for Caltrans 446 million downtown freeway repair. Luckily the injuries were not life threatening, but they did highlight the danger that comes with freeway projects such as Fix50. According to Caltrans data, vehicles crash into 45% of highway contractor work zones, with 12 private contractor worker death having occurred at sites in the last five years.

Local Caltrans district director, Jody Jones, stated that highway work can be one of the most dangerous jobs, with more highway workers being killed in the line of duty than Highway Patrol.

In regards to the Fix50 accident, two separate investigations are being launched, one by contractor Myers and Sons and the other by The California Division of Occupational Safety and Health. If an imminent danger to employees is determined, it could halt work on the project immediately. As of right now, many safety measures such as barriers, cones and police escorts are in place to guarantee the safety of the workers, but the most important safety precaution that can be taken is for the workers to watch out for one another. Workers work as a team, and often a worker in a vulnerable position will have a spotter. Sometimes, however, a worker may just forget how close he is to traffic. This may have been the case in the Fix50 accident.

To read more about this visit the Merced Sunstar.

 

Kenneth G. Marks has been practicing personal injury law since he was admitted to the California Bar in 1981.www.KmarksLaw.com